Lifestyle

Family from Pittsburgh spread awareness after beloved dog died of suffocation from chip bag


A family from Pittsburgh who now live in Florida is sharing their story after losing their beloved family dog ​​to something many people have in their homes and sometimes get away with. Watch the full story in the video player above. “I love the chocolate lab. They’re my absolute favorite,” says Holly Best. The whole family quickly fell in love with their new puppy Scout, when Holly and Brian Best brought him home. “He’s always been so sweet to everyone,” says Ceci Best, 14. Months after falling in love with Scout, the family says something tragic has happened. “I couldn’t believe it. I still can’t believe it happened. We thought we did everything right,” Holly Best said. The incident happened after the whole family fell asleep on New Year’s Eve. “We never thought about leaving a bag of chips out,” says Brian Best. Brian Best said he woke up to find their dog Scout with a bag of chips on his head. “He was lying on the ground motionless,” Brian Best said. “He was stuck in a bag of chips.” “When he walked into the room, he had a full-blown panic attack and at first he told me Scout was dead and I was thinking, what? He’s in the house,” Holly Best said. Scout was suffocated. “I was speechless after that and when I told my friends, I said Scout passed away in a bag of chips,” 12-year-old Tyson Best said. “It was heartbreaking because we didn’t expect it. He was perfectly fine the night before,” Ceci Best said. Holly Best said: ‘I’m more worried about him choking on dog meat or beef but it won’t be in a million years before I think of a chip bag. The family was desperate for answers, and after a Google search, Holly Best found a website called “Prevent Pet Asphyxiation” that a woman named Bonnie Harlan created in grief time. “Many times people tell me, ‘I’ve never heard of this,'” said Bonnie Harlan, who lost a dog to suffocation. The same thing that happened to Scout happened to Bonnie’s rescue dog Blue in 2011 in Texas. Harlan said: “I could see him from afar with a bag of Cheetos on his head and he wasn’t moving and in that brief moment I just knew he was suffocated in the chip bag. this. Bonnie’s vet quickly ran to her house. “And of course, I cried and he said you know Bonnie, I could have warned you about 100 things and a chip bag wouldn’t be on the list. He’d never heard of it either. that,” Harlan said. The Best family said their vet had also not heard of the snack bags being a danger to dogs or other animals. “It creates a vacuum seal around their neck, and as they continue to breathe, the vacuum-like seal gets tighter,” says Holly Best. The American Veterinary Medical Association details the warning on its website. Bonnie Harlan now uses her website to help educate pet families and displays pictures of some of the 1,500 dogs she’s learned about dying this way over the past decade. “I usually hear from three or four pet owners who are devastated each week,” says Harlan. Holly Best says: “As a mother, you feel guilty because it’s your job to protect your kids and the dogs included in our case. Now the goal is to help spread awareness. “Whether we save one dog or 100,000 dogs,” says Brian Best. The family is now fighting to do so for Scout’s honor. There are several things people can do to make their homes safer and avoid tragedies like this for pets, including pouring all your chips into a container, cutting the bag of chips into small pieces first. when to dispose of them, and learn helpful tips like giving your pet CPR. On a more cheerful note, the Best family said they have adopted a new dog for their home. https://www.avma.org/https://preventpetsuffocation.com/

A family from Pittsburgh who now live in Florida is sharing their story after losing their beloved family dog ​​to something many people have in their homes and sometimes get away with.

Watch the full story in the video player above.

“I love the chocolate lab. They’re my absolute favorite,” says Holly Best.

The whole family quickly fell in love with their new puppy Scout, when Holly and Brian Best brought him home.

“He’s always been so sweet to everyone,” says Ceci Best, 14.

Months after falling in love with Scout, the family says something tragic has happened.

“I couldn’t believe it. I still can’t believe it happened. We thought we did everything right,” Holly Best said.

The incident happened after the family fell asleep on New Year’s Eve.

“We never thought about leaving a bag of chips out,” says Brian Best.

Brian Best said he woke up to find their dog Scout with a bag of chips on his head.

“He was lying on the ground motionless,” Brian Best said. “He was stuck in a bag of chips.”

“When he walked into the room, he had a full-blown panic attack and at first he told me Scout was dead and I was thinking, how? He’s in the house,” Holly Best said.

Scout was suffocated.

“I was speechless after that and when I told my friends, I said Scout passed away in a bag of chips,” 12-year-old Tyson Best said.

“It was heartbreaking because we didn’t expect it. He was perfectly fine the night before,” Ceci Best said.

Holly Best said: ‘I’m more worried about him choking on dog meat or beef but it won’t be in a million years before I think of a chip bag.

The family was desperate for answers, and after a Google search, Holly Best found a website called “Prevent Pet Asphyxiation” that a woman named Bonnie Harlan created in grief time.

“Many times people tell me, ‘I’ve never heard of this,'” said Bonnie Harlan, who lost a dog to suffocation.

The same thing that happened to Scout happened to Bonnie’s rescue dog Blue in 2011 in Texas.

Harlan said: “I could see him from afar with a bag of Cheetos on his head and he wasn’t moving and in that brief moment I just knew he was suffocated in the chip bag. this.

Bonnie’s vet quickly ran to her house.

“And of course, I cried and he said you know Bonnie, I could have warned you about 100 things and a chip bag wouldn’t be on the list. He’d never heard of it either. that,” Harlan said.

The Best family said their vet had also not heard of the snack bags being a danger to dogs or other animals.

“It creates a vacuum seal around their neck, and as they continue to breathe, the vacuum-like seal gets tighter,” says Holly Best.

The American Veterinary Medical Association Warning details on its website.

Bonnie Harlan now uses her website to help educate pet families and displays pictures of some of the 1,500 dogs she’s known about dying in this way over the past decade.

“I usually hear from three or four pet owners who are devastated each week,” says Harlan.

Holly Best says: “As a mother, you feel guilty because it is your job to protect your children and the dogs included in our case.

Now the goal is to help spread awareness.

“Whether we save one dog or 100,000 dogs,” says Brian Best.

The family is now fighting to do so for Scout’s honor.

There are several things people can do to make their homes safer and avoid tragedies like this for pets, including pouring all your chips into a container, cutting the bag of chips into small pieces first. when to dispose of them, and learn helpful tips like giving your pet CPR.

On a more cheerful note, the Best family said they have adopted a new dog for their home.

https://www.avma.org/

https://preventpetsufflocation.com/



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