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Truck parked on I-680 in Omaha as authorities rescue woman


A fleet of trucks parked on Interstate 680 in Omaha as first responders helped a person with a mental health crisis. Omaha Police said they worked with the Nebraska State Patrol and pickup truck drivers to close the interstate. According to authorities, a firefighter used a ladder on the roof of one of the trucks to help the woman down. It’s really not surprising when I see photos or videos on social media of truckers doing the right thing,” said Kent Grisham. Grisham is president of the Nebraska Transportation Association. : “It’s really part of the culture and people don’t realize that there’s a long history of truckers doing amazing things on the nation’s highways,” says Grisham. good deeds are done, there’s an entire organization dedicated to recognizing them.” who needed to go a few more miles on the road. Drivers don’t typically have training for mental health emergencies, Grisham said, but do have safety training and CB radios to help communicate when something needs to be done, like This call was around 10:00 a.m. Monday. “It’s really part of the structure of the trucking industry in America,” Grisham said. Reminder for anyone who needs help or sees someone in crisis, 988 is the number to call. New works like 911 but will provide mental health help based on the caller’s area code.

A fleet of trucks parked on Interstate 680 in Omaha as first responders helped someone with a mental health crisis.

The incident happened around 10:15 a.m. Monday near Blondo Street on I-680 when officers saw a woman clinging to a fence on the interstate bridge, according to authorities.

Omaha Police said they worked with the Nebraska State Patrol and pickup truck drivers to close the interstate.

A firefighter used a ladder on the roof of one of the trucks to help the woman down.

The woman was not injured, but first responders took her to a hospital where she was placed under protective house arrest, according to authorities.

“Of course it’s fine. It’s not really surprising when I see photos or videos on social media of truckers doing the right thing,” Kent Grisham said.

Grisham is the president of the Nebraska Trucking Association.

He says that many motorists on the road do this good deed – it’s not often caught on camera.

“It’s really part of the culture and people don’t realize there’s a long history of truckers doing amazing things on the nation’s highways,” Grisham said.

He said drivers often stop their cars when there is an accident, a car fire, or help officers by creating blocks of taxiways.

Grisham says a lot of good work has been done, there’s an entire organization dedicated to documenting them.

“Professional truckers put the needs of the community and the person’s needs above the need to get a few extra miles on the road. Transport angels, as they call them,” Grisham said.

Grisham said drivers are not typically trained for mental health emergencies but do have safety training and CB radios to help communicate when something needs to be done, like this call on around 10 a.m. Monday.

“It’s really part of what America’s trucking business is,” Grisham said.

A reminder for those who need help or see someone in crisis, 988 is the number to call. The new hotline works like 911 but will provide mental health help based on the caller’s area code.



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